BA19

Untitled (2003)
From series "Imprints of Practice II: Transversions/Messed With"
Digital print on rice paper
Signed, numbered limited edition (4 of 21)
15 x 20 inches /38 x 59 centimters (framed)
Shipped from California, USA

1 ($670)
Inquire

"when
the
ball
comes

to
play it
with
your

prick,
your cunt
and
womb

to
play
it
with your
stomach,
solar

plexus,
heart
and
so on
up

to
play it
with your
lunacy, the
sky,
the limit-
less


and
so"


Torben Ulrich's note:
8. Print on rice paper, signed and numbered. Initial work, also on rice paper (see notes 1 and 2).
Printing procedure itself: initial rice paper photographed, then taken to Kinko's, copy and printing chain, an outlet of theirs in Seattle, where dear artist friend Monika Lidman, working there at the time (2003), offered to help. Photographed image of initial rice paper placed in Kinko computer printing machinery, Monica orchestrating improvised, maybe random, pushing of buttons, first under her guidance, then taking turns (also within singular printouts): interplay, fun (field's where you find it).
A way of seeing this particular composition, in terms of relationship between rope and text: viewed from above, red rope as curved line of swing, say, forehand, backhand or contemporary large volley motion, hitting down toward bottom of paper, line of text serving as axis for swing.
Going along with this reading, may raise question: how come ball at top appears behind swing? Possible answer: Player who swung missed. Happens.
Regarding color variations in brownish background, lighter patches as if radiating from red parabolas: initial impact of ink from rope bleeding out into rice paper, now slowly drying, and in process pulling up paper, sort of shrinking it, making paper wavy, uneven, adding perhaps dynamic sense of space.


(Number refers to this note, not the work's reference number. These notes can be read on their own and also as an ensemble, or set of concentric circles that can be read both from outside in and inside out. See the full Notes on Balligraphies.)


(See thoughts from Torben Ulrich about some of his works in Notes on Balligraphies.)